Creating an Inclusive Wedding Guest Experience

This article originally appeared in our V8 issue, now in retailers!

Whether or not you identify as LGBTQ+, chances are that at least some of your guests do. Follow our lead and ditch the heteronormative.

Confirm Titles

Pronouns and titles are fluid, so even if you think you know someone’s pronouns, never assume. Be sure to confirm your guests’ honorifics (Mr., Miss, Mx., Rp.) before printing save-the-dates, invitations, and escort cards.

Dress Code

Avoid gendered dress codes such as “men in suits,” and simply communicate the level of formality you expect from guests (ex: semi-formal).

Work With Inclusive Pros

Being truly equality-minded® is more than just being open to working with LGBTQ+ couples—vendors need to also do the work. Ensure that the wedding pros you work with have formally trained themselves and their staff on inclusivity and gender-awareness so they can not only give you a better experience, but also your guests.

BROWSE OUR EQUALITY-MINDED® WEDDING PRO DIRECTORY

All-Gender Bathrooms

Even if your venue has separate, gendered bathrooms, you can put a sign over theirs to ensure welcoming spaces for all. Don’t forget to include all genders’ toiletry items in both.

Speak Well

Be sure to communicate with anyone who is going to have access to a mic that inclusivity is important and they should avoid using gendered phrases such as “ladies and gentlemen.” Some key players to note: officiant, DJ/band, emcee, and those who are giving toasts.

Gendered Traditions

Traditions like the bouquet and garter toss are entrenched in gender. If you opt in to these rituals, open it up to everyone who wants to join.

Written by Brittny Drye | Photography Amy Van Vlear Photography

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